LGBT Info

Template:Sexual identities

LGBT and Queer studies
Rainbow flag flapping in the wind.jpg
Lesbian · Gay · Bisexual · Transgender · Homosexuality
History
Timeline · Gay Liberation · Social movements · AIDS timeline
Culture
LGBT Community · Gay pride · Coming out · Gay village · Queer · Queer theory · Religion · Slang · Symbols
Law
Marriage · Civil unions · Adoption · Sodomy law · Military service · Hate crimes · Laws around the world
Attitudes and Discrimination
Heterosexism · Homophobia · Lesbophobia · Biphobia · Transphobia
LGBT Portal · Categories
This box: view  talk  edit  

Template:Lesbian

Template:Lesbian feminism

Sexual orientation
Part of sexology
Classifications

Asexuality
Autosexuality
Bisexuality
Heterosexuality
Homosexuality
Pansexuality
Heteroflexibility

Sexual identities

Bisexual
Gay
Lesbian
Queer
Questioning
Straight

Measurement

Kinsey scale
Klein Grid

Study

Biology
Demographics
Medicine
Non-human animals

See also
Gender
Paraphilia
This box: view  talk  edit  
Wikipedialogo.png This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Lesbian. The list of authors can be seen in the page history.. As with LGBT Info, the text of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0.

Sappho and Erinna in a Garden at Mytilene by Simeon Solomon, 1864

Lesbians protesting for same-sex marriage.

The actual definition of lesbian is non men loving non men. So this means women cis or trans and non binary people no matter their agab can be lesbians as long as they aren't attracted to anyone who ids as a man cis or trans.

Symbol representing lesbian made from two interlocked astronomical symbols for the planet Venus. In biology, the singular symbol represents the female sex.[1][2]

A lesbian is a term indicating the exclusive homosexual attraction to women.[3][4] The word lesbian is used for women in relation to their sexual identity or sexual behavior, regardless of sexual orientation, or as an adjective to characterize or associate nouns with female homosexuality or same-sex attraction.[4][5]

The concept of "lesbian" to differentiate women with a shared sexual orientation evolved in the 20th century. Throughout history, women have not had the same freedom or independence as men to pursue homosexual relationships, but neither have they met the same harsh punishment as homosexual men in some societies. Instead, lesbian relationships have often been regarded as harmless, unless a participant attempts to assert privileges traditionally enjoyed by men. As a result, little in history was documented to give an accurate description of how female homosexuality was expressed. When early sexologists in the late 19th century began to categorize and describe homosexual behavior, hampered by a lack of knowledge about homosexuality or women's sexuality, they distinguished lesbians as women who did not adhere to female gender roles and incorrectly designated them mentally ill—a designation which has been reversed in the global scientific community.

Women in homosexual relationships responded to this designation either by hiding their personal lives or accepting the label of outcast and creating a subculture and identity that developed in Europe and the United States. Following World War II, during a period of social repression when governments actively persecuted homosexuals, women developed networks to socialize with and educate each other. Greater economic and social freedom allowed them gradually to be able to determine how they could form relationships and families. With second wave feminism and the growth of scholarship in women's history and sexuality in the 20th century, the definition of lesbian broadened, sparking a debate about sexual desire as the major component to define what a lesbian is. Some women who engage in same-sex sexual activity may reject not only identifying as lesbians but as bisexual as well, while other women's self-identification as lesbian may not align with their sexual orientation or sexual behavior. Sexual identity is not necessarily the same as one's sexual orientation or sexual behavior, due to various reasons, such as the fear of identifying their sexual orientation in a homophobic setting.

Portrayals of lesbians in the media suggest that society at large has been simultaneously intrigued and threatened by women who challenge feminine gender roles, as well as fascinated and appalled with women who are romantically involved with other women. Women who adopt a lesbian identity share experiences that form an outlook similar to an ethnic identity: as homosexuals, they are unified by the heterosexist discrimination and potential rejection they face from their families, friends, and others as a result of homophobia. As women, they face concerns separate from men. Lesbians may encounter distinct physical or mental health concerns arising from discrimination, prejudice, and minority stress. Political conditions and social attitudes also affect the formation of lesbian relationships and families in open.






Lesbian Flag


  1. (2000) "Symbols (by Christy Stevens)", Lesbian Histories and Cultures: An Encyclopedia, 1st 1 (Encyclopedia of Lesbian and Gay Histories and Cultures), Garland Publishing, 748. ISBN 0-8153-1920-7. 
  2. Stearn, William T. (May 1962). "The Origin of the Male and Female Symbols of Biology". Taxon 11 (4): 109–113. doi:10.2307/1217734. ISSN 0040-0262. Retrieved on 23 July 2019. 
  3. Lesbian. Oxford Reference. Retrieved on December 10, 2018.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Zimmerman, p. 453.
  5. (1999) Lesbian Health: Current Assessment and Directions for the Future. National Academies Press, 22. ISBN 0309174066. Retrieved on October 16, 2013.